Beaverbrooks: Diamond-a-Day

The Challenge

To find a creative way of reinforcing Beaverbrooks’ status as a luxury jewellery retailer and diamond expert in its centenary year.

 

The Idea

Recognising the media’s seemingly unquenchable thirst for quirky advent calendars, we created the ultimate in Christmas countdown extravagance – the Diamond-a-Day advent calendar. Worth over £100,000 (reinforcing the centenary message), it featured a dazzling piece of diamond jewellery or a watch behind every door, with a very special gift for Christmas Day.

The concept was not only attention grabbing but also showcased Christmas gifts at a range of price points, while leading with messaging that centred around aspiration and indulgence.

We reached customers as they were getting excited about gift buying (crucially we timed our campaign to be the first ‘quirky’ calendar of the year to hit journalist inboxes) and positioned Beaverbrooks as the place to go for luxury jewellery and diamonds.

 

The Results

An advent calendar filled with diamonds proved irresistible:

  • Within weeks, it had featured in dozens of nationals including the Daily Mirror, The Sun, Grazia, Marie Claire, Daily Star, OK! and Metro, with a significant portion of titles also covering the story from their social media channels
  • National coverage was supplemented with countless regional hits, alongside plenty of bridal and trade mentions too
  • Better still, ITV’s This Morning kicked-off a festive special with our advent calendar front of frame and Holly and Phil exploring its luxurious contents
    • This Morning’s producers then twice shared the story on the show’s social channels, garnering 16,000 likes, 4.5million organic views and over 4,000 social shares
  • A 60-second slot on Good Morning Britain, saw the calendar labelled the ‘crown jewels’ of the advent calendar world, and it later featured on the Jeremy Vine Show
  • Well over 30 backlinks were also secured from high-domain authority websites, enhancing Beaverbrooks’ SEO drive in the longer term